REVEALING THE AFRICAN PRESENCE IN RENAISSANCE EUROPE

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe

A Wealthy African from the Renaissance

Revealing the African Presence in Renaissance Europe invites visitors to explore the roles of Africans and their descendants in Renaissance Europe as revealed in compelling paintings, drawings, sculpture and printed books of the period. Vivid portraits from life both encourage face-to-face encounters with the individuals themselves and pose questions about the challenges of color, class, and stereotypes that this new diversity brought to Europe. Despite the importance of the questions posed for audiences today, this is the first time they have been addressed in a major exhibition. Organized by the Walters, the exhibition opens in Baltimore on October 14 and at the Princeton University Art Museum in February 2013. It will feature about 75 works of art drawn from the Walters, major museums in the U.S. and Europe, and private collections.

above: Portrait of a Wealthy African / Flemish or German / ca. 1540 / Private Collection, Antwerp

The exhibition is supported by funding from the Richard C. von Hess Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Maryland Humanities Council, the Bernard Family, Andie and Jack Laporte, Christie’s, Kathryn Coke Rienhoff, Lynn and Philip Rauch, Cynthia Alderdice, Joel M. Goldfrank, CANUSA Corporation Charitable Fund, Constance R. Caplan, Stanley Mazaroff and Nancy Dorman, the V.A. Reid Charitable Fund, Harbor Bank of Maryland, the Flamer Family Fund and other generous donors. The publication is generously supported by the Robert H. and Clarice Smith Publication Fund. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.