The Walters Art Museum

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Boshell Lecture: Crowning Glory: Art of the Americas

Date: Sunday, February 11, 2018

Time: 02:00 PM–03:30 PM

This special event marks the opening of Crowning Glory: Art of the Americas, a new installation/exhibition of ceramics, figures, and vessels from Central and South America that span more than 2,500 years and a diverse range of cultures. Lois Martin, independent scholar of pre-Columbian art, will speak about the art of the Nasca people, who flourished along Peru’s southern coast 2,000 years ago. After Martin’s talk, Ellen Hoobler, William B. Ziff, Jr., Associate Curator of Arts of the Americas, 1200 bce–1500 ce, and Angela Elliott, William B. Ziff, Jr., Senior Objects Conservator, will join the conversation about the art and artifacts on view in this new exhibition. Reception to follow.

Ted Low Lecture: Museum Displays and Power Dynamics

Date: Thursday, March 8, 2018

Time: 07:00 PM–08:30 PM

Where does cultural appropriation appear in museum displays? What can we as cultural workers and visitors do to change these paradigms of representation? Join cultural strategist and educator Keonna Hendrick for a conversation on cultural appropriation and strategies for combating it in institutional settings. Presented as the first in a three-part lecture series, Constructing Cultural Contexts, which examines museums through the respective lenses of race, gender, and religion.

Gendered Narratives

Date: Sunday, March 18, 2018

Time: 07:00 PM–08:30 PM

How can interpretation and teaching at the museum begin to address narratives about women that are currently missing? How can museums use their collections to talk about the intersectionality of gender with race? Join Ravon Ruffin and Amanda Figueroa, founders of Brown Girls Museum Blog, for a conversation with Christine Sciacca, Associate Curator of European Art, about the presentation of gender at the museum. Presented as the second in a three-part lecture series, Constructing Cultural Contexts, which examines museums through the respective lenses of race, gender, and religion.

Gendered Narratives

Date: Sunday, March 18, 2018

Time: 02:00 PM–03:30 PM

Free, advance registration requested How can interpretation and teaching at the museum begin to address narratives about women that are currently missing? How can museums use their collections to talk about the intersectionality of gender with race? Join Ravon Ruffin and Amanda Figueroa, founders of Brown Girls Museum Blog, for a conversation with Christine Sciacca, Associate Curator of European Art, about the presentation of gender at the museum. Presented as the second in a three-part lecture series, Constructing Cultural Contexts, which examines museums through the respective lenses of race, gender, and religion.

Buddhism and the Art of Enlightenment

Date: Saturday, March 24, 2018

Time: 02:00 PM–03:30 PM

Celebrated Tibetan Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman is the featured speaker for the Ford Lecture, which commemorates the Walters' new installation of Arts of Asia. A recognized worldwide authority on religion and spirituality, Asian history, world philosophy, Buddhist science, and Indo-Tibetan Buddhism, Thurman is an eloquent advocate of the relevance of Buddhist ideas to our daily lives. He has been named on of Time magazine's 25 most influential Americans, and is currently the Jey Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies at Columbia University. Thurman has authored books including the Central Philosophy of Tibet and Circling the Sacred Mountain.

Boshell Lecture: Religious Pluralism in the Museum

Date: Sunday, May 6, 2018

Time: 02:00 PM–03:30 PM

How do secular museums contextualize religious and sacred objects? Should museum displays use one religion to contextualize another? Join Canadian contemporary artist Jamelie Hassan for a conversation with Amy Landau, Director of Curatorial Affairs and Curator of Islamic and South & Southeast Asian Art, about religious pluralism in the museum. Reception to follow.